January 03, 2019 | University of Minnesota
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FDA Reports Major Drop in Antibiotics for Food Animals

Domestic sales and distribution of medically important antibiotics for use in livestock decreased by 33% from 2016 through 2017

FDA Reports Major Drop in Antibiotics for Food Animals

According to a report from the University of Minnesota's CIDRAP (Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy), new data released in December by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shows the amount of medically important antibiotics sold for use in food-producing animals in the United States is on the decline.

The FDA report shows that domestic sales and distribution of medically important antibiotics for use in livestock decreased by 33% from 2016 through 2017, and by 43% since sales peaked in 2015. Since 2009, the first year the FDA started collecting and reporting the data, sales have declined by 28%. The totals represent only sales and distribution data and don't reflect how the drugs were used in animals.

The 2017 summary report is the first issued since the FDA's new rules on the use of medically important antibiotics in food-animal production were fully implemented. 

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, said he's encouraged by the sales trends reflected in the report.

"These reductions are an indication that our ongoing efforts to support antimicrobial stewardship are having a significant impact," Gottlieb said in a statement.

Read the full report here.

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