August 09, 2016 | Arlette Sambs

Linking Quality to Trade

Feed & Grain LIVE to highlight the connection between grain quality and market opportunities

Linking Quality to Trade

Grain quality — specifically testing for mycotoxins — will be covered in two sessions at our upcoming LIVE event. Looking over our list of topics got me wondering how many times I’ve seen grain quality discussed during my tenure in this industry.

I’m sure, from GEAPS Exchanges, AFIA sessions, NGFA Country Elevator meetings, U.S. Grains Council updates and all of the articles our editors have written, it has to be (rightfully so) one of the industry’s top topics — right up there with safety. I remember many presentations on quality over the years, but most importantly, how the quality of the grain, oilseeds and other products we offer helps open and expand our market opportunities — which is why I’m so pumped about the closing keynote speaker for our event!

Ambassador Darci Vetter’s title is chief agricultural negotiator, which reflects her important role in U.S. trade. With her background in international economic development, sustainable development, increasing the opportunity for trade and her knowledge of the industry, she’s an incredible voice for U.S. agriculture. We’re very proud that she will deliver our closing address and eager to hear her viewpoint on a dynamic global marketplace.

Hard to believe that not long after you receive this issue, our first LIVE event will have closed following the ambassador’s remarks. We’ve worked diligently for many months, relying on input from the field, on our editorial instincts, on feedback from attendees and potential attendees, to develop and produce the conference. Our greatest challenge was distilling all the information on FSMA, key management topics and the importance of a safety culture, to provide a solid lineup.

All of this — from developing content for the event to wondering about how many times I’ve seen grain quality issues discussed in our industry — reminds me of the need to keep looking ahead and to keep asking about the best thing we should be doing now and tomorrow.

We can never say enough about safety, grain quality, regulatory issues or market expansion. We will continue to deliver the information you need, in the formats you use, to make sure we stay relevant.

That’s part of the “continuous improvement process” isn’t it? Or, like my dad used to ask us in the dairy barn: “Did you ever see anything get done by standing still? Then don’t!”

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