February 07, 2008 | Gerry Whitty

GEAPS Exchange 2008 Grows With the Industry

Preview the GEAPS Exchange slated for February 23-26, in Omaha.

If anyone is wondering about the relative health of the grain processing industry an indicator things are going well could be found in the sold-out trade show for the GEAPS Exchange 2008.

Two months prior to the Exchange, almost 375 booths had been sold - this after expanding the exhibit hall floor plan five times - shattering the previous record of 300 set at Exchange 2000 in Kansas City. With exhibitors still coming in, there's little question that the remaining booths will get snapped up, too. In all, the Omaha Exchange is likely to have more than 250 different companies exhibiting-and that's a record, too.

Another indicator is how the GEAPS has responded to its membership's thirst for information with an agenda packed with opportunities to participate in numerous sessions and activities covering the topics that matter most. In fact, the education program offers 33 hours of sessions - the biggest total to date - and extends over three days.

With the show reflecting the industry's strong economic health, the GEAPS members, volunteers and leadership have created a don't-miss event in the Exchange. (Editor's note: read the sidebar interview with outgoing International President Mike Myrick, to learn more about how GEAPS grew this event).


GEAPS Exchange 2008 will offer a morning-long workshop on a topic of special interest to the grain industry _

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