February/March 2014

February/March 2014

Grain Elevator Makeover Reinvigorates Community

Cover photo by: Elise Schafer

Digital Magazine


February/March 2014 Articles

Thinking Outside the Bin

Thinking Outside the Bin

February 13, 2014 | |

As farming operations grow larger and yields continue their climb higher, many commer­cial grain facilities are faced with the chal­lenge of handling higher volumes. In a lot of cases, the only solution is to pile grain on the ground, due to a lack of fixed storage. However, one South Dakota co-op, tired of dealing with the spoilage from exposed grain, started thinking outside the bin for a new flexible storage solution.

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The Costs of the 2014 Renewable Fuel Mandate

February 13, 2014 | Feature | Steven Kilger

On Nov. 15 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency shocked many when it acknowledged the “blend wall” that petroleum groups had been claiming for years, was, in fact, a reality that needed to be addressed immediately.

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Raising the Bar: A New Standard for Steel Bin Safety

Raising the Bar: A New Standard for Steel Bin Safety

February 13, 2014 | Feature |

It is estimated that more than 750,000 steel grain bins have been built in the United States in the past 75 years. It is anyone’s guess how many of these are still in use. In recent years, the industry has erected between 10,000 to 16,000 steel bins a year.

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Dreaming for Innovation

Dreaming for Innovation

February 13, 2014 | Editors Note | Elise Schafer

We’ve all been there, unintentionally, in the wee hours of the morning — some call it lucid dreaming — when suddenly a new idea pops into your mind.

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How to Decontaminate a Dry Grain Processing Facility
A row of chlorine dioxide gas cannisters line a dry grain facility in preparation for Salmonella spp. decontamination.

How to Decontaminate a Dry Grain Processing Facility

February 13, 2014 | Feature |

A 280,000-cubic-foot protein powder grinding, dry­ing and packaging facility had a Salmonella spp. con­tamination of some of the equipment. The facility was nearly impossible to decontaminate using conventional methods, not only because it was a large facility, but also because of its height. It was 90 feet tall with three floors in need of decontamination (the second through fourth floors).

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