February 26, 2014 | Views on the News | Steven Kilger | Views: 756

Views on the News: Exports Dominate the News, and Another Train Derailment

Plus, Chipotle makes a new video

Views on the News: Exports Dominate the News, and Another Train Derailment

The top stories for the week of Feb. 17 are …

 

  1. Two Hurt in Derailment at CHS Grain Elevator in Lowder, IL
  2. China Dumps Grain Policy to Boost Meat Production
  3. Canada Eyes Animal Feed as Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Spreads
  4. Cargill to Reject for Export Crops with New GMO Syngenta Corn
  5. AFIA Releases Statement Regarding Chipotles Farmed and Dangerous

Two Hurt in Derailment at CHS Grain Elevator in Lowder, IL

A rail spur on the track at a CHS Inc. caused an empty Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway train to derail, injuring two workers. The falling cars broke the supports under the facility’s control room, forcing employees to evacuate both it and the surrounding area. The two injured employees were hurt as they escaped the control room. During the bedlam, a loading boom spilled 100,000 bushels of corn, estimated to be worth around $400,000. CHS Inc. has started an investigation into the accident, but an official statement noted that the safety of its employees was their first concern. 

China Dumps Grain Policy to Boost Meat Production

It’s no secret that China’s demand for meat is increasing. As more of the population is elevated to the middle class, they are demanding more of the luxuries in life — which includes access to meat. China was finding it impossible to fill that demand while trying to be self-sufficient in grain production. The government has announced that it will stop trying to have both, and will be scaling back annual grain production targets. This will free up land to grow more valuable crops for China, while also freeing up chances for exports for nations better suited to grow the grains need to feed livestock.

Canada Eyes Animal Feed as Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Spreads

Little is known about the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) other than that it is hard to eradicate, spreads quickly and has killed somewhere between 1 million and 4 million pigs in under a year. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will be testing to see it the virus was accidentally aided in crossing the border by plasma for feed, sourced from the United States. The dissension was made after research was made available from Kansas State University recommending replacing porcine-based products in diets.

Cargill to Reject for Export Crops with New GMO Syngenta Corn

For the past several months, China has been rejecting shipments of corn from the United States due to a trait from Syngenta that they have not approved. So far, this has caused more than 650,000 tons of corn to be turned away at Chinese's ports. Another Syngenta trait called Duracade was approved by the U.S. last year, and helps fight rootworms. The trait has not been approved by China or the European Union. Companies learned the lesson from year, and both Cargill and Bunge have already stated that they will not be accepting crops with this new trait for export. The National Grain and Feed Association and North American Export Grain Association have asked for Duracade to be taken off the market until this mess was sorted out, but Syngenta refused, citing that farmers need new technology.

AFIA Releases Statement Regarding Chipotle’s “Farmed and Dangerous

Chipotle is at it again. After the success of its short animated film “Scarecrow,” Chipotle has once more decided to skew the facts behind modern farming in a mini-series on Hulu called “Farmed and Dangerous.” Under the disguise of satire and “encouraging a discussion on how our food is made,” Chipotle is attacking agriculture in an effort to target health conscious mothers and millennials, both of which are key demographics and show to care a great deal about where their food comes from. It helps that these are the groups that are more likely to watch Hulu.  The American Feed Industry Association (AFIA)  and most groups in agriculture have come out in opposition to the series, displaying disappointment to downright anger over the project. Sadly, Chipotle does not seem willing to look at both sides of the argument, and it will be up to everyone in modern agriculture to take part in presenting our side of the story.

 

As always, thanks for reading Views on the News and Feed & Grain. Don’t forget to catch up on what happened at IPPE.  We have tons of videos, images and news. I want to remind you to email me if you have any story ideas, comments on what news you want to hear about, or just to say, "Hey." Subscribe to Industry Watch, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook for all the latest news in the industry. See you next week.

February 18, 2014 | Views on the News | Steven Kilger | Views: 916

Views on the News: Engulfment Tragedies Top Last Week’s Headlines

The Farm Bill implementation starting

Views on the News: Engulfment Tragedies Top Last Week's Headlines

There have been a lot of reminders on the dangers of grain engulfment in the news lately, so from everyone here at Feed & Grain, whether you’re a grain handler, feed manufacture or farmer, be safe out there. The top stories for the week of Feb. 10 are …

 

  1. Napoleon, ND, Farmer Dies in Grain Engulfment Accident
  2. Rose Creek, MN, Farmer Rescued From Grain Bin
  3. President Obama Signs 2014 Farm Bill in East Lansing, MI
  4. CHS Inc. Returns $433 Million to Owners
  5. Record Setting $16 Million Verdict in Carroll County Obtained by Clifford Law Offices

 

Napoleon, ND, Farmer Dies in Grain Engulfment Accident

Farmer Charles Sperle died in an unusual grain engulfment scenario. Sperle was unloading his full 30, 000-bushel bin with a grain vacuum, when a funnel formed, causing the grain to pour out of the bin opening like a waterfall, covering him in seconds. Though drivers of the trucks being loaded tried to rescue him, Sperle was covered in grain for 20-25 minutes before rescue crews could free him.

Rose Creek, MN, Farmer Rescued From Grain Bin

Craig Nelson was rescued from his drying bin on Feb. 11 after having his legs submerged for 90 minutes. Nelson went into the bin to loosen soybeans after his unloading auger got stuck; luckily, the driver of the trailer being loaded heard his calls for help. Rescue workers drained the bin until Nelson was able to crawl out of the opening at the bottom of the bin. The late harvest and cool, wet weather this past fall has made grain quality an issue, making it more likely for individuals to enter bins when grain clumps. To read more about how improved grain quality can lead to bin safety should check out “Attention to Grain Quality Keeps People Safe” on pg. 18 of your February/March issue of Feed & Grain.

President Obama Signs 2014 Farm Bill in East Lansing, MI

President Barack Obama ended an odyssey when he signed the 2014 Farm Bill on Feb. 7. What should have been the 2012 or 2013 Farm Bill was held up for over two years while legislators fought over food stamps and subsidies. The Farm Bill will not only give certainty in the uncertain realm of agriculture, but reduces the national deficit by $23 billion. It also gets rid of direct payment subsidies, while giving more farm insurance options to a wider selection of crops. It also sets programs that aid conservation, disaster relief and job creation.  The USDA has already started setting up how to implement new and returning programs, with planting choices needing to made in the South and livestock disaster aid long overdue in some areas.

CHS Inc. Returns $433 Million to Owners

CHS Inc. will share its financial success with farmers, ranchers and cooperatives when it gives out an estimated $433 million cash distribution, the second largest in company history. The return to owners is based on CHS’s net income of $992.4 million for the fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2013, also the company’s second largest. The distribution will go to the 1,100 member cooperatives and more than 50,000 individual members of CHS Inc. More than $3.5 billion in cash has been given back to CHS’ agricultural producer and member cooperative owners, a billion of it over the past two years.

Record Setting $16 Million Verdict in Carroll County Obtained by Clifford Law Offices

A $16 million verdict was awarded to the families of Wyatt Whitebread and Alejandro Pacas, who died in a grain engulfment incident in July, 2010. Whitebread was only 14 when he was sucked into a sinkhole in the grain that he was standing on, while pushing the grain down to the conveyor. Pacas and another employee jumped into the sinkhole to save him but became entrapped as well. Pacas, who was 19 at the time, was engulfed in the grain along with Whitebread, while the other employee, Will Piper, was buried up to his neck for six hours. Whitebread’s and Pacas’ families were each awarded $8 million and Piper was awarded $875,000.

Thanks for reading Views on the News! Don’t forget to catch up on what happened at IPPE.  We have tons of videos, images and news. I want to remind you to email me if you have any story ideas, comments on what news you want to hear about, or just to say, "Hey." Subscribe to Industry Watch, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook for all the latest news in the industry.

February 11, 2014 | Views on the News | Steven Kilger | Views: 622

Views on the News: Chinese Facility Explosion and the Farm Bill Becomes Law

Scientists predict California drought could be a long one

Views on the News: Chinese Facility Explosion and the Farm Bill Becomes Law

The top stories for the week of Feb. 3 are …

  1. Nine Injured In Chinese Corn Processing Plant Explosion
  2. Senate Sends Farm Bill to President Obama
  3. ADM Reports Strong Adjusted Fourth Quarter 2013 Earnings of $0.95 Share
  4. Cargill Will Idle Raleigh, NC Soybean Processing Facility
  5. Scientists Fear Long California Drought

Nine Injured In Chinese Corn Processing Plant Explosion

Three workers were critically injured while six more needed medical attention after an explosion at a corn processing plant in the Heilongjiang Province of China. Heilongjiang Longfeng Corn Development Co., Ltd. is a leading agricultural products processing plant, with a capacity of over 900,000 tons. There is an investigation into the cause of the explosion, but no new news as of this writing.

Senate Sends Farm Bill to President Obama

The Farm Bill finally reached completion on Feb. 7, when President Obama signed the bill into law at Michigan State University. The bill has managed to squeeze through a divided congress after almost two years of negotiations that saw one extension of the 2009 farm bill and the threat of returning to the outdated permanent law. The new bill will expand crop insurance offerings while eliminating direct payments to farmers. Food stamps, one of the main stumbling blocks, will be reduced by 1%. 

ADM Reports Strong Adjusted Fourth Quarter 2013 Earnings of $0.95 Share

Adjusted earnings may have been up by 58% this past quarter, but Archer Daniels Midland Co.’s net earnings were down from $0.77/share to $0.56/share. This decrease was due to the company’s Brazilian sugar mill and the acquisition of the Australian company GrainCorp falling through. ADM’s Chairman and CEO Patrica Woertz was pleased with ADM’s biofuel performance and cost savings efforts.

Cargill Will Idle Raleigh, NC, Soybean Processing Facility

This year’s spring and summer processing of soybean meal at Cargill’s Raleigh, NC, facility will be suspended. Cargill cited the lack of consistent demand of soybean meal along with a high demand of U.S. soybeans from other sources for the reasoning behind their decision. The Raleigh facility will still buy soybeans from producers, and demands for soybean meal will be met by their Fayetteville, NC, facility. Cargill will continue to evaluate whether to open the plant for processing.

Scientists Fear Long California Drought

California has been in a drought for the last three years, with this past year having the lowest recorded rain fall in 150 years. This drought is pushing California’s water reserves to their breaking point, with many producers limiting or completely scraping their crops this year. This extreme drought in California may not be as short lived as many hope. Megadroughts are a fairly common occurrence in last 1,000 years of California’s history. Most of the Megadroughts last 10 to 20 years with the most extreme stretching out from 180 to 240 years, a stretch of dryness that modern California is not prepared for.  California is the United States’ largest state by population and a prolonged drought will have a ripple effect through agriculture and the rest of the economy.

The big news here at Feed & Grain is our Feb/March issue is finished and headed towards your doorstep. Get ready for a mammoth GEAPS Exchange 2014 Guide! We’re fresh from IPPE with videos, images and tons of feature ideas. I want to remind you to email me if you have any story ideas, comments on what news you want to hear about, or just to say, "Hey." Subscribe to Industry Watch, follow us on twitter or like us on facebook for all the latest news in the industry.

February 03, 2014 | From the Field | Arlette Sambs | Views: 578

Technology Takeover

Embrace 'techie' tools to make your job easier

Technology Takeover

I recently attended my daughter’s FFA awards banquet at a local high school where she teaches agriculture. Like most kids, everyone of the students had their cell phones in their hands, typing away. After a failed attempt to get the kids to practice one more time before the event started, the teachers confiscated all of the phones from the kids on stage — and it was like taking one of their arms away to give them up. The awards ceremony went off without any interruptions, at least no one could be seen texting anyway.

The reason I bring up this anecdote is because you see it happening everywhere. Everyone is always on their smart phone — from texting to talking with someone to browsing the Internet for “stuff” — what did we do before the invention of the mobile phone?

Mobile technology also serves as a valuable tool in the workforce. As one of my co-workers stated in a meeting: “[Smart phones] have become a news delivery device.” In this industry, we rely on it for so much more than communication between one person and another. Consider how much time it took to communicate between employees at a plant 10 years ago. They had to go to a desk to jump on a computer to enter any type of data, maintenance, production or safety related information.

Today’s younger generation is very “techie.” They rely heavily on their smart phones — they can find any information with Google, retrieve data, manage personal accounts, take a picture of a piece of equipment that needs some attention, text or call a supplier for some help on fixing a problem out in the plant. As our cover story explains, it cuts downtime and improves accuracy on record keeping for maintenance in eight of Southern States Cooperative’s plants.

There is definitely a generation gap between the folks that work in the plants and manage the plants; however, in this day and age, the older generation is being forced to get on board with smart technology at our workplaces. The list of benefits is endless — and it makes our jobs so much easier.

Here at Feed & Grain magazine, we will continue to deliver information anyway you want to receive it — in print, on our website and on our mobile site as well. Feed & Grain is there when you are looking for information, and we aim to serve all generations!

Please let us know if there is a topic you would like for us to cover in a future issue.

Thanks for reading!

February 03, 2014 | From the Field | Arlette Sambs | Views: 368

Proudly Serving You

Reflections on agriculture's contribution to the world

Proudly Serving You

Last month I attended the 2012 IDEAg Interconnectivity Conference in Altoona, IA. The conference brought together the entire interconnected agriculture sector — including large grain and livestock producers — for three days of cutting-edge education, exhibits and networking.

The opening presentation featured Kip Tom, managing member of Tom Farms LLC, based in Leesburg, IN. Tom Farms is a global production, sales and service operation, specializing in corn and soybeans, that operates over 16,000 acres in Indiana and another 4,000 acres in Argentina. 

Kip began by sharing a little about his family's farming background. Then he brought up an important concern he admitted to thinking about almost daily: the task of feeding 9.3 billion people in 2050. 

He went on to note the average person's caloric intake in the western hemisphere is 3,500 calories/day. In America, it’s more like 3,800 calories/day, when all we need is 1,800 to sustain ourselves. That statistic really caught my ear. What does this tell us? We are already producing enough food for this world, which is evident by the record U.S. obesity rate.

I never thought of famers as food manufacturers, but now it absolutely makes sense. Today there are some 5,000 producers who take raw resources to make a product that creates 30% of our food supply. 

But still, so many people don’t understand how food is produced. They stand on the sideline and let us do it for them. Kip urged us in the crowed to get involved; to educate today’s consumers about where their food comes from.

After listening to Kip, it made me a little proud of the knowledge and experience I gained from my farming background. That’s why I enjoy working in this industry. It keeps me in touch with the good folks who work together to feed this world. All of us are experts about the part of the food chain we touch, and should be proud of our involvement in agriculture.

February 03, 2014 | From the Field | Arlette Sambs | Views: 384

Information Evolution

How we've evolved our content, delivery options

Information Evolution

Welcome to our October/November issue! Thank you for investing time during this busy season to pick up, page through and read Feed & Grain magazine.

The Feed & Grain team works diligently to make sure the products we deliver meet your needs. For example, we’ve introduced new features to the magazine in response to your evolving needs and preferences, including our Digital Table of Contents in the print edition and our recurring Focus on Technology section.

Additionally, we are always updating and enhancing our website, www.FeedandGrain.com, to improve ease of use and offer more dynamic content. We developed a user-friendly Online Buyers Guide (found in the navigation bar on our home page), allowing you to search categories and find the products and services you need. We’ve also launched and continue to develop new e-newsletters, consistently providing you with more information.

These changes are part of the constant process we use to help make sure we remain relevant and important to you. Simply put, if we lose your attention — we lose.

Which is why we continue to evolve and improve our product offerings, particularly with digital technology. The “magic” of digital communication is that the more we learn about what you do and your information needs, the more targeted we can be in providing you with that information. It starts when you are gracious enough to provide us with your email address. So far, more than 1,500 of you have done so.

Please take a few minutes to register on www.FeedandGrain.com. Look for the REGISTER button at the top-center part of our home page, click it, then sign up for the e-newsletters and email notifications that you’d like to receive. Help us continue to learn more about your information needs and how to meet them.

With all of the options you have for finding information, we want to make sure Feed & Grain stays at the top of your list. We appreciate your help in doing so!

Arlette Sambs

Editor’s note: For more than 30 years Arlette has been involved with Feed & Grain’s audience and advertisers, and worked with many of the associations supporting the feed and grain industry. She’s serious — please let her know what more we can and should do to meet your information needs.

January 30, 2014 | Views on the News | Steven Kilger | Views: 337

China Inks Deals House Passes WRRDA and The USDA Gets Back to Work

And Cargill opens cutting edge horse feed facility

China Inks Deals House Passes WRRDA and The USDA Gets Back to Work

Chinese Delegation Signs 1 Billion in Deals with Iowa

The Hebei province, China, inked 20 separate deals with Iowa companies, for an estimated total of $1 billion. This continues the Hebei province’s long standing relationship with Iowa that stretches back to 1983. China has made recent deals with U.S. soybean organizations and the Ukraine, as it looks for ways to provide for its growing middle class. Though the details of individual agreements have not been made public, the deal will provide new jobs, economic investment and a continued relationship and access to a giant emerging market. 

Man Dies in Accident at Grain Elevator in Harvey, ND

Alex Rall, an electrician, died in an accident at the Prairie Towers Elevator in Harvey, ND. During the installation of a distributor, a grain chute came loose while being moved. The chute was between 250 to 300 pounds and fell 120 feet before hitting Rall, who was leaving for the day. The accident is still under investigation by OSHA at the time of this writing. 

House Passes $82 Billion Water Projects Bill

The Water Resources Reform and Development Act did the seemingly impossible; it passed through the U.S. House of Representatives with overwhelming bipartisan support. While the Farm Bill seems to be moving at a snail’s pace, with significant obstacles to overcome on the SNAP nutrition portion, the WRRDA flew through the House with a 417-3 vote and will soon go to a conference with the Senate. The bill was passed by playing up its job making potential and that it affects almost every state. The bill will make moves to allocate money in order to finance a much needed upgrade of the nation’s waterways. Some of the infrastructure being used are approaching their 100th birthdays, and the question of if they will fail has been replaced with when they will fail. Because other nations that are in direct competition with the United States are upgrading their infrastructure, the United States’ upgrades are a must in order to stay competitive in the global marketplace.

USDA Reports Corn at 39% Harvested with Soybeans at 63%

After going dark for two and a half weeks due to the government shutdown, the USDA released its first crop report of October. Wet conditions are slowing down the harvest in much of the Corn Belt, and the crop report reflects this. Corn harvested is 14 percentage points behind the five-year average and 46 points behind last year. Luckily, the maturity of the corn crop has grown to 94%, just about the five-year average. Soybeans are at 63% harvested, a 50 point rise from the last report in September and close to its five-year average.

Cargill Opens State-of-the-art Horse Feed Plant

Cargill’s new horse feed plant in Strathroy, Ontario, opened on Oct. 23. The facility will produce its Purina® equine feed and supplements and Loyall®  dog and cat food. The facility cost around $11 million to build and equip and was necessary for Cargill’s goal of meeting the increasing quality demands of its customer.

It’s hard to believe, but this week’s Views marks our fourth month with the new format. As always, I want to thank you for reading and remind you to email me if you have any story ideas, comments on what news you want to hear about or just to say hey. Subscribe to Industry Watch, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook for all the latest news in the industry.

January 30, 2014 | From the Field | Arlette Sambs | Views: 354

Roots Run Deep

Getting back to an “aggie” home.

Roots Run Deep

The farm on which I grew up has changed hands — probably more than once — since my parents passed away. My brother worked the land for a while, but the era of small dairy and hog farms with 120 acres of corn and alfalfa is a few decades behind us.

I enjoyed the farm — even with all the work we had in front of us every day. My siblings might argue that I enjoyed socializing with other farm kids even more so. Probably true. County fairs and showing livestock were great … and just happened to be where I met the guy who became my husband.

Working on Feed & Grain in my adult life has given me a different perspective on agribusiness. I have a better understanding of global demand and transportation infrastructure issues, of the challenges of high-efficiency throughput and top-flight feed manufacturing. But I also understand, because of my background, the foundation of agriculture: hard working men and women who think smart and work smart every day to feed the world. Those who help them to become more efficient are a key element of every farm’s success.

It’s fitting then, to note that in my hometown of Evansville, WI, Landmark Services expanded its grain shuttle facility, adding storage, a new grain dryer and improving receiving and load out in 2013. All part of a significant investment in helping their customers have more and better options serving the world’s food chain.

There are times when I shake my head in wonder at the technology, capacity and speed of today’s modern facilities. I
wonder what Mom and Dad would think to see agriculture, though it passed us by, growing and strengthening in that little corner of the world. I believe they’d be proud that, for a couple of generations, they laid the foundation for an ag community that continues to grow.

I’ve written recently about the changes in the world of media, and of our acquisition by the American Farm Bureau Federation. There is a link, I’ve realized, that we’d been missing at Feed & Grain. That link is agriculture. As part of a media company, we were one brand among many. As part of the Farm Bureau, we are as we were in Feed & Grain’s roots, surrounded by “aggies.” And it makes me feel at home again.

Best wishes for a great 2014 and beyond.

Arlette Sambs
Publisher, Feed & Grain

November 06, 2013 | Views on the News | | Views: 290

Fall Harvest Inches Closer to the Finish Line

Grain fire erupts in Nebraska and Perdue Farms gets sued again

  1. Perdue Farms Sued Over “Humane” Labels
  2. Fire at Grain Elevator in Gordon, NE, Over Weekend
  3. Corn at 59% Harvested With Soybeans at 77%
  4. ADM Reports Adjusted Third Quarter 2013 Earnings of $0.46/Share
  5. United Ethanol in Milton WI Cited by OSHA After Employee Death in April

Perdue Farms Sued Over “Humane” Labels

Perdue Farms has been accused of trying to profit off of the increased customer concern over where the foods they buy are coming from. Wendy Roy of Palm Bay, FL, who filed the lawsuit, claims that Perdue follows the same guidelines, set by the National Chicken Council, as most of its competitors, but tries to fool customers into believing that the chickens they raise are better treated. The lawsuit is attempting to be classified as class action so that other customers will be able to join in. The language in the lawsuit insinuates that current practices used by the industry are “a system of mechanized brutality,” which gives merit to Perdue Farms’ counter claim that the Humane Society of the United States is attempting to use this lawsuit in order to attack their brands. The company also claims that it goes further than NCC guidelines in ensuring that its chickens are humanly treated. A similar lawsuit against Perdue Farms from 2011 is still being played out in the court system after a judge threw out many of the claims. 

Fire at Grain Elevator in Gordon, NE, Over Weekend

A large fire broke out on Oct. 24 in Gordon, NE, at the Gordon grain elevator. The fire took teams of firefighters from the surrounding counties and North Dakota to contain. It was contained by noon the first day, but crews doused hot spots and flare-ups into the early hours of the next day, soaking the grain with an estimated 1,900 gallons/minute of water. The cause of the fire is unknown, but spontaneous combustion of grain is believed to be responsible.

Corn at 59% Harvested With Soybeans at 77%

The USDA reports fall into the category of things that you don’t miss until they’re gone. After the U.S. government shutdown of last month, it was nice to see a new USDA report. Corn jumped 20% with this week’s closing in on the five-year average. Soybeans jumped 14%, bringing it even with the five-year average. With the release of this week’s report, both corn and soybeans have climbed just above their five-year average.

ADM Reports Adjusted Third Quarter 2013 Earnings of $0.46/share

While adjusted earnings were down $0.07/share from ADM’s third quarter last year, net earnings were up to $0.28/share. Other highlights included an increase in oilseeds processing profit of $25 million along with a $91 million increase in corn processing profit. Agricultural services profit did decline $122 million though, due to weak exports. ADM’s net debt is down to $3.4 billion.

United Ethanol in Milton, WI, Cited by OSHA after Employee Death in April

This is a story that we’ve followed closely at Feed & Grain. Our south-central Wisconsin home in Fort Atkinson is a mere 20 minutes from Milton, WI, and the death of Jerad Guell deeply affected the community we live in.  United Ethanol has been cited with 15 violations, 12 of which were classified as serious and one that was labeled willful. According to OSHA’s Field Inspection Reference Manual CPL 2.103, a violation is willful when “evidence shows either an intentional violation of the Act or plain indifference to its requirement.” The violation in question was the failure to lock out the conveyors that empty bins when an employee is inside. United Ethanol is being fined $140,000 and being placed within a program that requires inspections to make sure that the company is in compliance with regulations.

As always, I want to thank you for reading and remind you to email me if you have any story ideas, comments on what news you want to hear about or just to say hey. Subscribe to Industry Watch, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook for all the latest news in the industry.

October 30, 2013 | Views on the News | | Views: 285

China Inks Deals, House Passes WRRDA and The USDA Gets Back to Work

And Cargill opens cutting edge horse feed facility

The top stories for the week of Oct. 20 were…

  1. Chinese Delegation Signs 1 Billion in Deals with Iowa
  2. Man Dies in Accident at Grain Elevator in Harvey ND
  3. House Passes 82 Billion Water Projects Bill
  4. USDA Reports Corn at 39% Harvested with Soybeans at 63%
  5. Cargill Opens State-of-the-art Horse Feed Plant

 

Chinese Delegation Signs 1 Billion in Deals with Iowa

The Hebei province, China, inked 20 separate deals with Iowa companies, for an estimated total of $1 billion. This continues the Hebei province’s long standing relationship with Iowa that stretches back to 1983. China has made recent deals with U.S. soybean organizations and the Ukraine, as it looks for ways to provide for its growing middle class. Though the details of individual agreements have not been made public, the deal will provide new jobs, economic investment and a continued relationship and access to a giant emerging market. 

Man Dies in Accident at Grain Elevator in Harvey, ND

Alex Rall, an electrician, died in an accident at the Prairie Towers Elevator in Harvey, ND. During the installation of a distributor, a grain chute came loose while being moved. The chute was between 250 to 300 pounds and fell 120 feet before hitting Rall, who was leaving for the day. The accident is still under investigation by OSHA at the time of this writing. 

House Passes $82 Billion Water Projects Bill

The Water Resources Reform and Development Act did the seemingly impossible; it passed through the U.S. House of Representatives with overwhelming bipartisan support. While the Farm Bill seems to be moving at a snail’s pace, with significant obstacles to overcome on the SNAP nutrition portion, the WRRDA flew through the House with a 417-3 vote and will soon go to a conference with the Senate. The bill was passed by playing up its job making potential and that it affects almost every state. The bill will make moves to allocate money in order to finance a much needed upgrade of the nation’s waterways. Some of the infrastructure being used are approaching their 100th birthdays, and the question of if they will fail has been replaced with when they will fail. Because other nations that are in direct competition with the United States are upgrading their infrastructure, the United States’ upgrades are a must in order to stay competitive in the global marketplace.

USDA Reports Corn at 39% Harvested with Soybeans at 63%

After going dark for two and a half weeks due to the government shutdown, the USDA released its first crop report of October. Wet conditions are slowing down the harvest in much of the Corn Belt, and the crop report reflects this. Corn harvested is 14 percentage points behind the five-year average and 46 points behind last year. Luckily, the maturity of the corn crop has grown to 94%, just about the five-year average. Soybeans are at 63% harvested, a 50 point rise from the last report in September and close to its five-year average.

Cargill Opens State-of-the-art Horse Feed Plant

Cargill’s new horse feed plant in Strathroy, Ontario, opened on Oct. 23. The facility will produce its Purina® equine feed and supplements and Loyall®  dog and cat food. The facility cost around $11 million to build and equip and was necessary for Cargill’s goal of meeting the increasing quality demands of its customer.

It’s hard to believe, but this week’s Views marks our fourth month with the new format. As always, I want to thank you for reading and remind you to email me if you have any story ideas, comments on what news you want to hear about or just to say hey. Subscribe to Industry Watch, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook for all the latest news in the industry.

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Mycotoxin Report:October 13

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October 14, 2014 |

The Monday Mycotoxin Report is a collection of confirmed reports from many sources to provide viewers a macro-overview of mycotoxin levels in grain across the U.S. and Canada.

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